7 Things To Include On Your Facebook Profile

Whether you are planning on using a personal page or business page, the one common thing you need to nail on both, in order to be noticed by your people, is a smashing profile. Your profile, much like the cover page of your sports portfolio, is the deal breaker if coaches will choose to take notice, or just scroll on. You have approximately three seconds to impress someone before they scroll on, so you need to pack your profile with punch. Below are 7 things you can include on your profile that will surely impress even the hardest of audiences.

1- First, let’s go back to basics and start at the beginning. The profile picture. This should be a photo of YOU! Your profile picture is only small, so a face shot is the most effective. Let your audience see who you are, show them the face they will never forget. An action shot will not have the same effect because the tile is small and you will be lost in sea of other tiles. So smile, and let your winning grin shine.

2- Now, insert your cover photo. This is the long rectangular photo that sits at the top of your page, and is where you put your action shot. You can play around with this inside Facebook, or you can design one on CANVA or similar program. Use a nice background, insert your action shot, and dot-point some of your stats or milestones. The thing to remember is, tell your audience who you. It should be a powerful statement of who you are and what you do. This will ultimately draw your intended audience in, so tell them what they want to know.

3- Okay, don’t laugh at me when I say this one, but make sure your name, is actually YOUR name. Don’t use an alias or some kind of weird terminology, use your name, the one you want to be remembered by for years to come. If a coach sees your name on a profile that pops up on their social media page, and they have seen your name throughout the college applications, they see your name in the media as you rise, they switch to their other social platforms, and they see your name there also, pretty soon, they have seen your name more than sixteen times, and you are now etched in their mind. You are here because you want to achieve the college dream on a sports scholarship. To be successful, you must etch yourself into your audiences mind, and stay there!

4- Your bio! Your bio is your paragraph to shine. You have only a few lines to write a short story about YOU. It’s your mission statement. Describe where you are, and where you are going. Show determination, positivity, and a winning attitude. When your audience reads your bio, they should feel like they need to follow you and your future endeavours, because you make your future look bright and positive. Convince your audience that you, are who they want to be watching.

5- Your details! You don’t need to include any personal information, but you do want to treat this section like a mini resume. Add your past and current work experience and education. You only tell your audience what you want them to know, however, do be mindful that the more details you can give surrounding work and education, the more your audience can learn about you, before they even receive your email with your sports portfolio. There is every chance that coaches will already have decided they want you, just by following your social profile. You won’t need to add your city or hometown, although it is a good idea to give your audience some indication of a rough area so they know how far you will need to travel for your interviews etc.

6- Now, let your audience know what you like to do for fun in the hobbies section. You can include your likes and dislikes, the things you love to do in your spare time, and even the competitions you plan to enter for the year. You can put anything you feel passionate about, and any strong points of view you may have. Have fun with the hobbies section, but remember, keep it clean. Your future coaches, trainers, teachers, and bosses will be reading ALL of your profile, so make sure you don’t have bad language or crude activities in there.

7- The ‘About’ page! Much of this section is the same as what you have already included in your profile. Basically, it’s a summary of what you have, with a few added goodies. There is a work, education, and places you have lived section, then you are asked for contact information. Again, you do not have to provide phone numbers or street addresses, but you can add your other social media platforms , website, and email address. This way you are giving your audience plenty of forms of contact without giving any personal information away. There’s a section for you to add your basic information such as gender, date of birth, and relationship status. Only answer what you are comfortable answering, but it’s a good idea to let your audience know how old you are so they know when to be expecting you on their team. Include any other names or nicknames you like to be known by, and you can even put in your family members. check-in at any exciting places or competitions you are at, add all your favourite sports (besides your main love), and your favourite books, movies, music, websites, events, and groups. And don’t forget to load it with all of your amazing photos. Have fun remembering all of those wonderful things you like to do when you’re not absolutely working your butt off.

If you are new to the wonderful world of Facebook, these 7 items for you to include in your profile are a very good start to creating yourself a sporting profile that coaches, and your people will love. There is so much more you can add, but these are the main areas people want to know about. If you would like any help in creating yourself a sporting profile that smashes the rest out of the park, become a member of Promoting Elevating Athletes by following this link https://mailchi.mp/d2e37d7ced4e/joinpromotingelevatingathletes and my team and I will show you everything you need to know to get started on the right foot today. Stay tuned with more great tips on creating your Facebook world to come. Yours in sport, Brooke Hamilton.

What do you find the most challenging part of securing sports scholarships and maximising opportunity from year 9 for your athlete?

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